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to gettysburg and can you stand there on a hot july day and through the heat and bucolic countryside, can you still sense the cost of war and it's critical. and you can learn a little bit about the history of the cost of war, which i think is important for all americans and american presidents to understand. pickett's charge was basically a suicidal run up the side of cemetery ridge. >> you stand there and you go to so many battlefields and there's no way for you to recreate it but you stand at the top and you look down at pickett's charge and you just gasp. >> you look down and you can envision 12,000 to 13,000 confederate soldiers rushing up that hill into the incredible volley and velocity of the union artillery. and you can understand why general longstreet disagreed with general lee about doing this, about the tactics involved and you can certainly understand that during the course of july 3rd and yesterday july 4th they took the day off to gather the dead. but on the evening of july 3rd general lee urges general pickett to reinvigorate his division and go back at it and general pickett
feet off the ground. atlantis's last flight was in july of 2011. it was also the last of nasa's historic shuttle program, end of an era. the next time the public sees the spacecraft, it will be housed in a special museum at kennedy space center in florida. a grand opening is set for this summer, and who else would be there but our own john zarrella to bring us up to date on the project. whoa, do you look good. now, let me get this straight, john. this is a 180-foot-tall shuttle. it weighs more than 152,000 pounds. and it's shrink wrapped in plastic right now? >> reporter: yeah, it is. and you know, for the viewers out there, if you don't recognize what's there behind me, that's atlantis. in 16,000 feet of shrink wrap in order to protect it. you know, i've got the hard hat on. we're right here inside. there's guys working, building the museum around the shuttle atlantis as we speak, working nearly 24/7 to get ready for that grand opening. and you see the angle, alina, of how it is displayed here, supported on giant supports. that's a 43 1/2-degree angle. it is the angle that th
weekend. the weather channel's julie martin is at new york's laguardia airport. how bad is it right now, julie? >> reporter: right now we are getting a bit of a break, craig, but there is more to come with this system. it is just now a little bit south of the new york city metro area. i'm at laguardia, and i can tell you we've seen 50 or so cancellations as of this morning and this afternoon, but more likely to come as the snow really starts to work its way into the city this afternoon and this evening. we're looking to pick up anywhere say one to three inches in manhattan and some of the higher elevations like the hudson valley and you could be looking at anywhere from 6 to 8 inches and cities like boston are going to get socked this evening and we could see anywhere up to a foot of snow in the boston area so certainly travel in and out of logan is not going to be too keen by the time tomorrow morning rolls around if you are trying to get there for the holiday destination for the new year. here in new york it's not as big of a storm as we saw in the past week where we saw hundreds of d
. >> july 16th, 1969, show time. >> you think about the count down as the curtain opening worry is a wasted emotion. it clouds clear thinking that is absolutely needed when something goes wrong. >> the launch another stellar of fire was lost. three-day trip from the earth to the moon without insurance den the. >> we have a happy home. there's plenty of room for the three of us you. >> he coupled the lunar module from the command module and guided safely to the moovenlt on the way down armstrong and aldrin realized they were going long beyond the landing duck and into a boulder. that's when armstrong took over diverting from the plan he was now flying above unfamiliar territory searching for a safe spot to land while running low on fuel. >> we are on far side. looking at the altitude and it is about 100 feet. >> 60 seconds. >> 60 seconds. >> we are still a ways off the ground we have 60 seconds. i am getting concerned. >> we got very tense in mission control biteling our nails and holding our breath because we are running out of gas. i called eagle 30 seconds. 13 seconds later on the stopwat
on july the 25th the democratic bill is, quote, a revenue measure that didn't originate in the house so it's got no chance whatsoever of becoming law, end quote. that's what i said back on july 25th. the only reason we ever allowed that vote on that proposal, as i said at that time, was that we knew it didn't pass constitutional muster and that democrats were really serious they would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house, as the constitution requires, and as i called on them to do again last week. to repeat, the so-called senate bill is nothing more than a glorified sense of the senate resolution so let's put that convenient talking point aside from here on out. last night i told the president we'd be happy to look at whatever he proposes, but the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here, and as i said this is a conversation we should have had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check for anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that wouldn't be fair to the american people. that havin
been delayed at laguardia airport now, -- we have julie martin with us. >> reporter: we are getting a break, we have seen snow and a bit of sleet, visibility is one of the big issues and we are down to about a mile or so. not the greatest situation, but one thing helping the flights and the pilots are the winds. the winds are not all that strong. so fortunately the flights have been able to come and go, but we are seeing the delays starting to mount a bit. overall here in new york and new jersey, we have seen 197 flights cancelled and hundreds of delays at the three airports but here at laguardia, not all that bad considering what we experienced a couple of days ago with the last system that came through cancelling thousands of flights and stranding hundreds of pass enerr js. so, at this point, it's a wait and see, we could get a bursts of snow coming through the tri-state area later this evening and the winds will continue to pick up. i expect travel conditions to worsen as the afternoon and night goes on. craig? >> julie martin, braving the elements, we appreciate it. thank you. s
the grand opening in july and not only the shuttle which is the centerpiece of all of this but there will be a telescope replica suspended here in this exhibit area. there will be about 60 int active games and such for people to see and use and play with and get an idea of what it's like again, it last flew in july 2011. that was the final shuttle flight of the shuttle program in history and atlantis, of course, the last of the shuttle fleet to fly. candy? >> john, thanks so much. it looks like fun. i will be there next summer. >> sure. >>> you're in "the situation room." happening now, the uniquely washington version of let's make a deal. we have the latest from the this afternoon's big meeting in the oval office. who's eavesdropping on your e-mail? the government may be. what congress is doing that may have civil libertarians up in arms. >>> and a plea for help describing work conditions and it may be a hoax and dirty international politics. welcome to our viewers around the united states and around the world. wolf blitzer is off today. i'm candy crowley and you'r
and that the speaker was offering him that you had to raise rates. obama himself, as you know, said last july, july, 2011, you can get $1.2 trillion by eliminating loopholes, which is exactly what republicans offered him. so why did he insist on the rates? he said that is what he will insist upon, and that was the ultimatum. he did that because he knew it would create a crisis among the republicans and it did. so right up until now obama has what he wanted, which was a partisan, political success. he's been less worried about the fiscal issue for two reasons. number one, he does not care about debt. he hasn't in the four years. and number two, he thinks he's a political winner ifer the cliff. he thinks he's holding all the cards. >> all right. charles, let me agree with one point. you use the term, and i will concede that's the perfect term, ruthless skill. but, as bob woodward pointed out when he wrote this book about the grand bargain negotiations, it's not going to be looked at through this historical prism as the boehner era, this is the obama e.r.a. if the economists are right and things don't
're in for any kind of calamity. >> 20.3. >> that was in july. look at the february and april. they're actually -- well, april is just about even where we are now. february certainly doesn't suggest any kind of a plunge. >> no, doesn't portend any kind of craziness. thank you, mary. >> tyler. michelle, thank you. with senate majority leader harry reid warning we are going over the fiscal cliff, let's pose the question is it better if that were to happen. are automatic spending cuts perhaps what the country needs? josh bulk is a national correspondent with the fiscal times. josh, good to have you back. good to see you. >> good to see you. >> it's not all that bad if we go over the cliff. is there a good, compelling argument to make for doing so? >> there are compelling arguments to make for going over the cliff. it might create pressure for a genuine and real deal, not just with tax reform but spending cuts, but there's a lot of dangers in doing it. one of the big things that's screaming on my radar is the alternative minimum tax. that's a tax that is meant to prevent the wealthiest from escapin
in july that says 98% americans, income up to 240,000 would continue to get tax cuts. above that, people would may more. they made excuses, the bill wasn't right. we have the bill in the house, the bill in the senate. the bottom line is when the speaker put on the floor last week the bill that would say, okay, how about everybody up to $1 million gets a tax cut. couldn't even pass that. we're stuck. we're really stuck. >> the house gop said they put a bill forward in august. so everyone sort of covering themselves saying we got a bill. we didn't ask to go over the fiscal cliff. i'm kind of glad at 3:00 this afternoon, both sides of the house leader smip and house are meeting. do you think that there is the will to go in and say we've got to solve this. guys, we have just got to solve this. we cannot riske putting america back into a recession. consumers are feeling badly now, but were feeling okay. do your colleagues get how serious this is? we could send america to recession? >> i believe in the senate that we do. we're having a lot of very important, very good, positive conversations b
. >>> here it was on its final mission in july of last year. watch. >> all three engines up and burning. 2, 1, 0, and lift off. the final lift off of atlantis on the shoulders of the space shuttle. >> now the retired space shuttle will still be in the air, but not as high. elevated off the ground in its permanent home at kennedy space center. the new museum is set to open, but we're getting a sneak preview from john zarrella. john, i can tell by the hard hat and vest that it's still being bui built. a lot of work to be done. >> reporter: yeah, victor, this is an active construction site we're at. this is the museum facility. 90,000 square feet, $100 million project. when atlantis was towed over here, one of the walls was left off to get the vehicle in. . so everybody is asking, where's atlantis? let's take a look. that's it. in shrink wrap. 16,000 square feet of shrink wrap has been used to protect it it from debris that might fall as they are literally building this entire facility around the shuttle atlantis. and i've got the director of development here with me. i wanted to ask you. you ha
. >> july 20th, just past midnight, terror inside theater nine. >> aurora, colorado, nine miles east of denver, there's been a mass shooting at a movie theater. >> prosecutors say james holmes donned protective gear, threw tear gas and began firing. in the end, 12 people killed, 58 others wounded. holmes faces 152 charges. many victims continue to recover while others will never recover the loss they suffered that night. and number one. >> unimaginable horror grips the nation in one of the deadliest school shootings in u.s. history. >> tragedy at sandy hook elementary. >> this is unspeakable what happened in this town. >> innocent children shot dead in their classrooms, the victims, 16 6-year-olds, four 7-year-olds along with six adults. >> emily's laughter was infectious and all those who had the pleasure to meet her would agree this world is a better place because she has been in it. >> in newtown, connecticut, an outpouring of kindness and compassion, while a nation faced hard questions about mental health and guns. as the president issued an emotional call for action. >> for thos
years old. i just started to the july. i know the dogs learn to swim and you can throw them in. i thought i will imagine. i wasn't. and then all of a sudden i left my body. my spirit just left my body and went into this incredible tunnel of white life light. the most brilliant light i had ever seen. started floating effortlessly. my first thought was first piano teacher and second piano teacher and third piano teacher i realized i had a good wonderful life. how could i be dying i just got started. then i realized it was pretty great that being in this tunnel of light it was very surreal and i did have a choice to struggle and go back or i felt that i could just simply release and continue in this journey and this tunnel of light. and i know it was a wonderful glorious thing gretchen but you were saved. >> i was saved. i did get so far as to see the face of god welcoming me into heaven and its with a beautiful cloud-like father-like face of god. >> gretchen: how has it changed how you lived the rest of your life through your faith and your music? >> it changed my life to appreciate
while broadening the base. david: all right. now, that was in july of 2011 and then a couple of week-- a couple of months later came out with the budget, saying the tax system should be simplified and work for all americans with lower rates and brackets. the president has come out time and again saying we shouldn't raise any kind of rates. is anybody calling him on that? >> well, a lot of republicans are wondering what's different now? we still have a sluggish economy, why the change in position? , but the president was out on the campaign trail, time and time again saying individuals and families specifically making over $250,000 a year should be-- should get tax increases so he's sticking to that position, like i mentioned before, the white house seems to be signaling that they would move in the direction of 400,000, those making over 400,000 increases there which may be something that congress could agree on and get through. but again, we're going to have the conservative wave in the republican house saying no increases, so, boehner's going to be in in a position do i get democrat
it was in wake of the preannouncement. if you bought the stock the last time ceo was on in july, you have lost 19%. let's check in with vivek ranadive, founder and chairman of tibco software. let's find out about the quarter and company's prospects. welcome back to the show. >> jim, thank you for having me. it's always a pleasure to be on. >> all right. when things are great, we say how come they were so great, what happened? you were very candid on your call. what went wrong and how are you fixing it? >> well, jim, we failed to execute in north america in our core business. it was entirely our fault. no excuses. we have made a leadership change and that takes effect starting now. but there were parts of our business that were very strong. visual analytics were up. there's no question there is strong demand for our products. we failed to execute in certain areas. >> okay. there was one -- i know everyone knows the federal government is having a tough time. they seem to have spent less with you than they did previously. the federal government stiff you? what happened? >> it was bad execution. i ca
the granddaughters would carry his torch. so suzanne, i hope i'm sitting on the couch with you again on july 18th for his 95th birthday. >> that would be very nice. i would certainly hope that happens. nadia, thank you very much. i appreciate it. and if you want to see more, tune into cnn's "early start weekend" for nadia's full interview with mandela's granddaughters. that's tomorrow at 6:00 a.m. eastern. >>> and u.s. army general whose temper earned him the name stormin' norman has died. general norman schwarzkopf was one of the most celebrated leaders in the post-vietnam era. he led forces in kuwait after "operation desert storm." the retired general died yesterday in tampa, florida. president obama says the country has lost an american original. he was 78 years old. >>> in the philippines, at least 11 people are dead after a tropical cyclone slammed the central part of the country. the storm brought heavy flooding, landslides as well. two people are still missing. now, earlier this month, more than 1,000 died when a typhoon swept through that very same area. >>> the florida man known as the d
, for better and some for worse. july 1776, the american founding fathers' decision to declare independence. january 1863, abraham lincoln's decision to emancipate all persons held as slaves. june 1941, adolf hitler's decision to invade the soviet union. august 1945, president truman's decision to use an atomic bomb against japan. tonight, we'll examine the process of making a tough decisi decision. we'll hear about major decisions on an international stage, about corporate decisions and personal ones. from taking down the most wanted man in the world -- >> the president turned to us and said i made my decision. we're going to go with a raid. write up the orders. >> to giving up a dream career. >> it was this sense of almost unreality, of just i'm not sure i know who i am. >> to uprooting a company culture. >> some people actually quit. >> to opening the door to a closed society. this is like a spy thriller. >> absolutely. >> each of my guests has wrestled with a difficult choice. they will take us through their deliberations, their fears, and how they made their tough decisions. >>> at 11:
the right to own guns is more important. opinion was essentially divided in july after the deadly movie theater shootings in aurora, colorado. 47% said it was more important to protect gun ownership. 46% said it was more important to protect gun rights. a big part of the debate stems from the number of guns in this country. there are more than 297 million privately-owned firearms in the u.s. according to a congressional research service report. the gun industry here is thriving with profits doubling during the great recession. u.s. firearms remain one of the most successful industries in the world. stock prices of the two largest publicly traded firearm companies skyrocketed from the president's inauguration to the latest high. smith & wesson up over 260% and industry leader sturm, ruger and company up over 500%. just to give you an example here of comparison. you would have made less money if you bought a share of tech darling apple which had a lower gain than sturm, ruger & company, but you didn't have to buy stock to win. industry jobs commonly reward employees with a $140,000 salary
that box. >> so many rich moments for you. >> sports highlight of the year in middle of july with four minutes left in the game and the basketball team took the lead over the heavily and i mean 33-point heavily favored u.s. team. >> once is enough. >> highly patriotic person you are. >> let's just do sports highlights. >> let's do it. >> beating oklahoma in september. >> you know, it's funny because whenever we talk about sports, me and steve are arguing and arguing like, you know, 6 versus 1/2 dozen and we won't them to be penalized but a lot or a little. >> we squeeze eight minutes out of that. >> it was a nonargument that became an argument. >> steve? steve, i can't believe you didn't work in there your dominating toure on the musical choice naming of the graphic -- >> that was a highlight. >> i didn't want to embarrass him. >> one time. >> very, very obscure song by the four tops. he thought it was the temptations. he insisted. >> that i remember. they remember. >> i think that was the highlight for a lot of people. >> i see the love you guys have for me and the way you -- >> thank
. i knew how stocks worked. peaked in july 2006, in part because they did a 5-1 split. even though they weren't supposed to do anything this encouraged people who had been in hansen a long time to take it off the table. and it picked up its fourth analyst, may 10, 2006 when goldman started covering the stock. two months to sell between goldman's initiation and the stock peak. prudence dictated we sell once the stock had four analysts. better to clear out early with inning than to wait for them to fade away. hansen and all other hot stocks started to cool off. and incredibly after hansen fell off the radar screen, and the active analyst coverage dwindled, the stock dwindled. an amazing ren nance, and when analysts stop following the company, but the company's earnings start speculating as the case with hansen in 2011, a storied lazarus like move can happen. especially when monster ended up vanquishing the competition, when everyone said would wipe out monster, but didn't materialize, after the dramatic fall from grace, they renamed the company monster. you must know when to sell and
been worked out some time ago. august of the end of july the house-passed tax bill and senate over to the senate. there were free taken up an amended and take it back. that's the way things usually work. revenue bills must originate the house of representatives. we get to work six months ago. a work product six there and wait for the senate to take something up. here is what is troubling about all this. we will get through this this week however it turns out or next week, however turns out. you are right about the debt limit. that is going to recess well, and then just after that have an appropriations lapse. so the first three months of the year you have fiscal cliff, debt limit, and appropriations laps all staring the american people in the face. i get it that people are sick of this combat at the same time it is because we have such an nasa's spending problem is the reason why these things are occurring the way they are. tom: you heard the president come out and talk to the white house press corps. he talked about maintain a middle-class tax cuts. he did not define what that is
of deductions going to the simpson-bowles type of thing. let's play a sound from him in july 2007. play the sound bite, i will get your reaction. >> give us 1.2 trillion in additional revenues which could be accomplished without hiking taxes for tax rates but could be accomplished by eliminating loopholes and eliminating some deductions, and engaging in a tax reform process that could have lowered rates while broadening the base. david: without hiking tax rates. a couple months later he came out with his 2012 budget in which he said the tax system should be simplified. it worked for all americans with lower individual and corporate tax rates and fewer brackets. what changed his mind? >> he came out after the election saying he wanted 1.6 trillion in tax hikes, and his election kind of made him go for something figure. even though that meant he couldn't get an agreement. my personal view he does not want an agreement with republicans, he wants us to go over the fiscal cliff because republicans will get flamed and we will have a different scenario with the lowest rate not being 10%, but 1
yet again. it hit the highest level since july. the vix is up 30% over the last month. >>> apple's tim cook is getting a 99% cut in compensation this year. cook will take home $4.2 million compared to 378 million bucks in 2011. apple made clear the decline has nothing to do with performance. cook's sky-high 2011 pay package was largely award of one million restricted shares of stock after he took the reins at apple as ceo. that money would come in handy in washington, wouldn't it? that is our top story. the senate convened today for emergency session to deal with the fiscal cliff. the house has announced plans to reconvene on sunday. both senate majority leader harry reid and senate minority leader mitch mcconnell spoke a short time ago and neither sounds hopeful of fiscal cliff deal will be made before the deadline. so at this point is there any chance the united states can avoid taking a fiscal cliff dive? joining me for more is republican senator john hoeven of north dakota. and very simply, sir, we appreciate you being here but is harry reid right? are we going off the cliff? >> we
that vote back on july 25th, the democratic bill is, quote, a revenue measure that didn't originate in the house so it's got no chance whatsoever of becoming law, end quote. that's what i said back on july 25th. the only reason we ever allowed that vote on that proposal is i said at that time was that we knew it didn't pass constitutional muster. and the democrats were really serious, they would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires and as i called on them to do again last week. to repeat, the so-called nate bill is nothing more than a glorified sense of the senate resolution. so let's put that convenient talking point aside from here on out. last night i told the president we'd be happy to look at whatever he proposes but the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here and, as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check or anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that wouldn't be fair to the american peop
, on the floor we call it the growth dividend. if you look at a chart for our ten-year starting on july 26th, and i pick july 26th because that was mario draghi's big day. he said anything it takes. as you look at our rates over that period, then look at the boon rates over that period. you can see that the growth/disparity, our yields are higher in that formation than boon yields, because even though funding issues have been largely contained since that july 26th day, we can still see that the prospects for growth may be reflected in these charts, as the prospects for growth are larger in the u.s., fiscal cliffs issues would make it larger. foreign exchange, mainly everybody on this post-holiday, light volume session, seems to have one eye on the yen. whether it's against the u.s. currency, the dollar/yen or euro/yen. both patterns look more aggressive on the dollar side. obviously abe as prime minister is going to bring along with him the largest printing press we can remember recently. and that, of course, will start a chain reaction and maybe other printing presses will run a little fast
talked about this is a couple of years ago when we hit hit it in july and i was dead wrong. i was entirely dead wrong. i thought congress would make sure we wouldn't lose our aaa debt rate. >> and we did. >> and -- yeah. i figured certainly logically that yields would go up on bonds. and that the stock market would fall and just the opposite happening. what happen this time to the markets still have patience. you know, rinehart talk about that bang moment when countries are able to continue to issue really cheap debt for a long, long time. sounding like forever and boom. it stops. i don't think that will be this moment. but sooner or later, the world's financing capability and -- intentions and -- stop. >> what do you do right now? i think a lot of people who were watching don't understand necessarily what impact hitting the debt ceiling would necessarily mean to them or to the nation's finance. personally, i think there is a lot of pier mongering in washington and i don't think it is necessarily that big of a deal. what do you do with your finances right here? what are you in
senate bill from july does exist but boehner won't bring it to a vote." and deb thinks the damage has already been done. she says consumer confidence is down, the gop have failed the american people again. share your thoughts on facebook and twitter using the hashtag edshow. coming up i'll share my thoughts on "django unchanged." dr. james peterson joins us to explore the controversy surrounding the film. stay tuned. >>> she's got a sky-high approval rating, but first lady michelle obama says she's not interested in running for political office. at least that's what she told barbara walters. >> you said you that don't have the patience for political life. patience for what? >> i have learned from my husband, watching him, that it does require a great deal of patience to really feel the full impact of the work you do on the ground. it doesn't happen right away. >> and she has a bigger difficulty biting her tongue. >> i think i've done pretty well at that. >> but despite her reluctance there are some who say she would make a great lawmaker. congressman jim clyburn believes mrs. obama wo
july does exist but boehner won't bring it to a vote." and deb thinks the damage has already been done. she says consumer confidence is down, the gop has failed the american people again. share your thoughts on facebook and twitter using the #edshow. coming up i'll share my thoughts on "django unchanged." dr. james peterson joins us to explore the controversy surrounding the film. stay tuned. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle...and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. now this...will work. [ male announcer ] just like you, business pro. just like you. go national. go like a pro. >>> she's got a sky-high approval rating, but first lady michelle obama says she's not interested in running for political office. at least that's what she told barbara walters. >> you said you that don't have the patience for political life. patience for what?
. >> sitting at 21.29. >> a level we haven't seen since july when the market peaked so a few more people are throwing in the towel as we go into the weekend. >> a pity. so much focus on what people call it noise or headlines, whatever we want to say. we did get positive economic data today, didn't we, in the form of housing data and home sales data and the chick pmi and that's pretty much being ignored and everyone is focusing on what headlines come out of washington. we'll be back with the closing countdown. >> and i'll talk to one trader who has been one of the most positive on the floor expecting a resolution. we'll get his take now. also, after the bell health care stocks have had a pretty good year but what happens under obama care next yore? how to play that sector still ahead. you're washing cnbc, first in business worldwide. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. to the best vacation sp(all) the gulf
this looming fiscal cliff a week away while consumer confidence is at its lowest level since july. retailers need to pull out the big guns to do everything they possibly can to lure shoppers into stores even now before last few hours of christmas eve. we're seeing prices slashed. 50% signs off everywhere. here at the galleria they may have seen a record number of shoppers but shoppertrak which takes a look at traffic over the holiday season, they have actually changed their forecast from 3.3 now down to 2.5. so we'll have to wait and see if this last minute weekend shopping has an effect at all on their bottom line. melissa: it will be interesting to see how final numbers come in although it looks very busy there i would not want to go to a mall today but i'm apparently alone in that. thanks very much, lauren. for anyone who has not gotten a perfect gift for someone on the list there is still time to go to amazon and buy my book! i will shamelessly plug my book. "diary of a stage mother's daughter", not too late. amazon, barnes & noble, they all have it. it's a great read. i have my own here
do with a decision? this is the highest point* of a one-year term. the highest point* is from july. this is the environment right now. it is a holiday but we will watch each sector under pressure. lori: more news then redo this time. tracy: fiscal clef finger-pointing underway in washington. harry reid says they're headed over the cliff. it is really about senator harry reid and mitch mcconnell? >> to develop the political staring contest democrats say republicans need to move and around rego. the president arrived this morning from hawaii and so with the top democrats and republicans but still no update to report. senate majority leader harry reid said it looks like we're going over a cliff and it is up to the house. >> speaker boner shed call people back to washington today and should not have let them go. they are not here. john boner cared more about his speakership than the financial footing. >> they're now working on a fiscal clear solutions they say the majority leader should talk less and legislate more. also mitch mcconnell says the leader is happy to review with the presi
well. >> there you go. >> let's hope on the 18th of july, in the year 2013, you and i are sitting here celebrating nelson mandela's 95th birthday. >> can you imagine? i think we will. >> let's hope. >> fingers crossed. thank you, nadia. really appreciate that. >>> it is still -- it is still -- it will still be in the air, but a little closer to the ground. the shuttle "atlantis" soon to go on display in florida. we'll show you the plans next. productivity up, costs down, time to market reduced... those are good things. upstairs, they will see fantasy. not fantasy... logistics. ups came in, analyzed our supply chain, inventory systems... ups? ups. not fantasy? who would have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. because for every two pounds you lose through diet and exercise, alli can help you lose one more by blocking some of the fat you eat. let's fight fat with alli. ♪ >>> okay. let's get you back now to the white house. and you see that is washington, obviously. and you see the new york stock exchange. we're keeping an eye on the stock exchange. it is down now. it is down n
're celebrating? i don't think it's easter or july 4 and we haven't quite gotten to new year's day yet. i believe the holiday we're celebrating is christmas. and we should call it a christmas tree. and they kind of set it o rest that they don't really use that word here, that they're more inclusive than calling a christmas tree a christmas tree. >> rick: you bring up a good point. when you and i were kids, it was very common, everybody said merry christmas to everyone at that time. and i grew up in a predominantly christian town. when i moved away into a larger city and eventually had some jewish friends in a town that didn't have a big jewish population, i suddenly became away there was hanukkah. we said things happy holidays to have an idea of inclusivity. but this has gone so far the other way. how do you think that transition happened? >> well, i think we've become so politically correct, frankly speaking, that really our brains have fallen out. it is okay to say merry christmas. it is okay to say happy hanukkah. the supreme court has already weighed in on these issues and two landmark cases,
to remove galstones and these are the most recent pictures only him taken in july by cnn at his 94th birthday party in 'tis home surrounded by his large family. but he looked bewildered and didn't smile. so different to the vigorous man who fought so hard, endured so much. other recent years, though, the former south african president has seemed frail and unsteady on his legs. public appearances became increasingly rare. just too much effort for a man in his 90s. those he did make, mandela sometimes dozed off during speeches and seemed confused. he's mostly spent his time at this home in the eastern cape. soothed by the slow pace of the rural rhythms in the hills near his boyhood village and it's unclear whelp and if he'll return back to his primary residence here. for now, though, south africans are just relieved that he's out of hospital. >> mandela, he's alive. >> i can see that. >> i'm worried about this. at least if he can manage to reach at least it, that would be grateful. >> reporter: a man who gave so much and who is still so deeply revered by anxious south africans. you jus
and fierce winds. the unrelenting heat also proved deadly in the mid-atlantic and midwest states after july storms killed at least 22 people across the area. it also knocked out power, leaving millions sweltering. heat-related deaths climbed the to at least 20 in the chicago area. the by easy was not spared this year. hurricane isaac making landfall near new orleans on the eve of the 7th anniversary of hurricane katrina. isaac made landfall as category 1 hurricane. the slow moving storm drenched coastal areas. here is one of the hardest hit areas, plaquemines parish. it moved slowly inland inundating communities in arkansas as it passed. eerie skies over phoenix as a massive dust storm called a haboob blows in. winds 40 miles an hour bringing dust and sand from the desert. 2012 also saw the birth of a superstorm, a devastating hurricane that collided with a powerful cold system from canada that slammed the northeast. sandy made landfall in south jersey late october, flooding beach communities, submerging highways and washing iconic boardwalks into the observing shun. new york city's downtow
and color-coded. >> you're wrapped? everything? >> who spends their fourth of july holiday wrapping christmas gifts? >> i have been known to buy in summer sales. >> when were you finished? >> early. but, if you're not, "gma" has great tips for you. places you can still, today, last-minute, go and shop and grab really good deals. we have a list. stay with us. we're checking it out. >>> is ma in her kerchief and i in my cap? our all-star version. never heard it like that before. >> no, never. >> sounds terrific. >>> first this story. the dentist who fired his long-time assistant because he says she was too attractive. she's had a spotless employment record, she had no romantic interest many him in him at all. but the judges backed the boss. good morning, linsey. >> reporter: good morning, lara. you remember the song i'm too sexy? apparently, it's too sexy for your job. parentally, you can can a person for being ir resistibly attractive. imagine being fired because you're just too sexy. that's what 32-year-old melissa nelson said happened to her. after working for a den tis for ten yea
that came within my parameter. >> reporter: in july 1991 president george h.w. bush awarded schwarzkopf the presidential medal of freedom and last night the former president who is struggling with his own health crisis issued a statement saying "shwords cop of epitomized the duty service, country creed that has dchbed our freedom." schwarzkopf knew the value of peace, and the price of confrontation. >> the more you sweat in peace, the less you bleed in war. >> reporter: general norman schwarzkopf was 78 years old. for "cbs this morning," bob orr in washington. >> schwarzkopf's former boss is likely to be hospitalized for a while according to the top aide. the 41st president is in intensive care at houston's methodist hospital being treated for a persistent fever. this morning his condition remains guarded but mr. bush's chief of staff, jean becker says we should "put the harpz back in the closet" meaning he's sick but not that sick. >>> the powerful winter storm that caused trouble across the country is finally moving out, left parts of western new york and pennsyl
june and july? in the past, the nation has gone through some kind of panic attack expecting five dollars for a gallon of gas. >> i do not see five dollars at all next year. i do not even see four dollars. i expect $3.75 to be the height of the peak. what i expect is nothing will happen until the new year when both congress and the president come back. they enact new tax cuts. neither side is interested in any sort of significant spending cuts. liz: where do you see oil and gas prices in that scenario? >> well, in that scenario, i think oil prices could rise if we just had the tax cuts because the spending will continue unabated and the dollar will get weaker and commodity prices will get higher. liz: thank you. let's stay with oil. we will bring in our very own jeff flock. what are you watching out there? jeff: we were at the cme yesterday. talk about what the impact of the fiscal cliff has done to the oil market. take a look at oil prices today. since christmas, we are up about 3%. take a look at the volume. if you look at the volume of trading, and "wall street journal" was ont
nationwide consumer confidence came in at the lowest rating since july. >> there's no question, especially from sandy, at the beginning of november, there was a lot to make up as we got throughout the course of november. but black friday came back nicely. we actually think that it's more going to affect some of the lower income consumers as you look back at the consumer confidence numbers than the higher end special names. we think it will hold it pretty well throughout the season. >> speaking of high end specialty names, you do favor coors and lululemon, those are some of the highest retailers out there. what do you see coors doing right? what sorts of sales numbers do they need to see this season to justify the valuation? >> they're at about 27 times. which given the kind of growth rate they've seen, i don't think it's all that expensive. the same-store sales were 25% last quarter. don't see that slowing even though we have modeled in a slowdown from that. not just at their retail stores, where they have a lot of room to open more stores. at the wholesale accounts, the big department sto
a bill back in july. why can't the house just confirm that? >> oh, come on because the senate is a joke. they haven't even been able to pass a budget in over three years. come on. >> the senate passed a deal in july that dealt with the amt. it dealt with dividends and capital gains and it dealt with the, the fundamental issue of the tax rates. so i mean -- >> no, it dealt with the -- >> -- won't go up. >> i mean, let's have some consensus. let's at least agree on the things that we agree on, and then work on the more troubling issues afterwards. >> i saw annie yesterday, keith, and daddy warbucks had that same hairstyle. i think it's very compelling. i think -- >> i don't know if i'd call it a hairstyle. >> but it's a power, daddy warbucks was hot. he was. >> power. >> power i think is what it is. >> not a lot of response to that one. >> i think you know exactly what you're doing, yeah. anyway, thank you, susan. thank you. >> don't try it susan. you look good like you do. all right, see you later. thank you. >> okay, guys. coming up, the latest on the winter snowstorm that's slamming th
including the latest crash involving a bullet train which killed 40 people. remember that? july. patti ann: well, anxiety is rising over big tax hikes and spending cuts set to kick in on january 1st. a growing number of lawmakers saying they are skeptical that a deal can be reached in five days to avoid the fiscal cliff, especially with the main sticking point coming down to whether to increase taxes for top earners next year among many other things. byron york, now, of "the washington examiner" joins us to talk about this. good morning, byron. >> good morning, patti ann. patti ann: so we're going to show a full scream of what would happen if -- full screen of what would happen if we go off that fiscal cliff. but you got democrats, including congressman john yarmouth of kentucky, saying, look, we may go off that cliff on january 1st, but we would creak it very quickly -- correct it very quickly thereafter, so do you believe that's the democratic plan? enter yes, and it's a republican nightmare. republicans have been reached no deal's reached, barack obama and democrats immediately propose
song gets utus past the fiscal cliff. >> the last time this happened in july of 2011, the credit rating was downgraded. the government's, not mine, but i guess i live here. that could happen again, right? >> we have seen that the politics are raising the debt ceiling are quite difficult. in 2011 your right what standard & poors said is americans political problems appear to be severe enough that they can't take care of business. we'll see if we have the same trouble this time around. the thing to remember is that the real problem is not the debt limit it's the debt. if they get serious about a deal to take down some of the debt and stop the growth they can take care of the debt limit in the same process. gregg: when the government dominates the credit marketplace by absorbing all of those borrowed dollars, doesn't that steal those dollars away from american businesses that it would seem to me desperately need phepl t them to keep operating. >> it's called crowding out. that is implications for investment. it has implications for our ability to export. those dollars finance exports. very
. number eight, summer heat wave. sweltering heat baked the nation this summer. march and july set u.s. records as the hottest of all time. number seven, western wildfires. >> smoke in the air. >> the heat wave helped fuel a string of wildfires that hit the west. number six, the deratio in june. >> it began in iowa, moved through illinois, indiana, ohio and moved into washington, d.c. it took a fast moving long lasting violent thunderstorm complex. >> after charging 800 miles, 22 were dead and 5 million were without power. number five, the dallas 22. there is an old myth that tornadoes don't hit big cities. april 3rd proved otherwise when twisters hit dallas. >> scary. it was so scary. it reminds you of the wizard of oz when the tornado hit and everything just going around and around. >> 22 tornadoes caused a billion dollars worth of damage in 24 hours. number four, deadliest tornado. tornadoes took up three spots in our top ten countdown, but this event was the deadliest. march 2nd and 3rd, 70 confirmed tornadoes killed 40 people in the midwest. number three, hurricane isaac. hurric
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